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Achillea Yarrow

Achillea Yarrow
Achillea is an upright perennial with fern-like foliage and large plate-like flowers. Some Achillea are semi-evergreen, they are suitable for borders and rock gardens. It tolerates most soils but prefers a sunny well-drained site. Tall species and cultivars need staking or plant supports. Achillea can be propagated by dividing in early spring or autumn - soft wood cuttings can be taken in early summer.

There are many varieties - A.Millefolium, 'Fire King' (2ft- 2.5ft spread 15in.) has 4in. wide flattened heads of tiny white to cerise flowers, from June to September and A .ptatmica 'The Pearl' which has daisy-like white flowers in 2 - 4in. wide clusters also from June to September. A filipendulina 'Gold Plate' can be dried for decoration or flower arranging.
Plant Supports for Small to Medium Sized Garden Plants


Aconitum Monkshood

Aconitum Monkshood
Poisonous perennials with upright stems bearing hooded flowers in summer. It's good in rock gardens and borders. It is fully hardy, prefers sun but can tolerate some shade. Plant aconitums between October and March in moist deep soil in partial shade. Mulch annually in spring after their second year. Cut down the flowering stems in October. To propagate divide the roots between October and March - sow seeds in March or April.

A.napellus grows to 3-5ft planting distance 15". It has deep blue flowers with 1" hoods in July and August. A.Wilsonii grows to 4-6ft with a planting distance of 18" and will need some support. It has pyramids of amethyst -blue flowers with hoods up to 2" high in August and September. 'Barker's Variety' has deeper blue flowers.
Plant Supports for medium to large plants


Allium

Allium Onion
Perennials with bulbs (some of which are edible), rhizomes or fibrous rootstocks. Nearly all have narrow basal leaves smelling of onion when crushed and most have small flowers packed together in a dense spherical umbels. Dried umbels of tall border species are good for winter decoration.

Alliums thrive in well-drained soil open to the sun. Plant in September or October, covering the bulbs to 3 times their own depth. Large plants will need staking or plant supports. Alliums are frost hardy and best left to form clumps. Propagate by dividing the clumps or plant seeds in autumn.

A.giganteum grows to 4ft. with a planting distance of 9-12". It has lilac star-shaped flowers produced as 4" umbels in June. It looks good in large pots. A.moly, height 12", good for borders and rock gardens, has grey leaves and bright yellow star-shaped flowers in 2" wide umbels during June and July.
Plant Supports for Single Stems


Alstroemeria

Alstroemeria
Summer flowering tuberous perennials needing well-drained soil and a sunny, sheltered spot. The flowers are good for cutting as they last well. They are frost hardy but in very cold weather cover with dry bracken or loose peat to protect the tubers. Alstroemeria can be grown in borders or in cool greenhouses. The trumpet-shaped flowers are produced from June to September. Plant in March or early April using young pot-grown specimens and taking care not to disturb the roots. The flowers 1 - 2" wide and rich yellow to orange-scarlet with the two upper petals veined with red. Alstroemeria benefit from staking or plant supports.

Good garden varieties include: A 'Walter Fleming' summer flowering , height 3ft. has leafy stems producing narrowly lance-shaped twisted leaves and widely funnel-shaped deep yellow flowers 2" across, flushed purple with reddish purple spots. A.violacea grows to 3ft with a planting distance of 9-12". Half hardy each of its stems carries a dozen or more bright lilac flowers, each measuring 1 -2" across.
Grow Through Plant Supports


Aster Michaelmas Daisy

Aster Michaelmas Daisy
There are 500 species of these hardy herbaceous perennials, differing in height, flower-size and colour. The flowers are daisy-like and in nearly all cases have yellow centres. Asters are frost to half-hardy, and prefer fertile well-drained soil. They can be propagated by division in spring or by seed in autumn. Asters need a sunny open position with well drained soil that does not dry out in late summers and autumn when they flower. Plant between October and March.

Most of the taller species will need staking or plant supports. A.albescens is an upright sub-shrub growing to 3ft. It is frost hardy. It has grey-green leaves and produces flattish sprays of lavender-blue flower heads with yellow centres, in mid-summer. A.lateriflorus is a branching perennial, height 2ft. spread 20in. Fully hardy it bears sprays of tiny, mauve flower-heads, with pinkish-brown centres in autumn. The lance-shaped leaves are small and dark green. A.tradescantii is an erect perennial, height 4ft spread 2". It has lance-shaped leaves and in autumn clusters of small white flower heads appear on wiry, leafy stems and provide a good background to bright autumn colours.
Plant Supports for medium to large plants


Campanula Bellfower

Campanula Bellfower
Spring and summer flowering annuals, biennials and perennials, some of which are evergreen. Campanula grows in sun or shade although delicate flower colours are preserved best in shade. They are suitable for growing in borders or rock gardens or for edging paths and borders. They look particularly effective when frown in bold groups of one variety. Several varieties are good for cutting. To cultivate plant between September and April, avoid exposed sites for taller varieties which will need support. Remove faded flower spikes unless seeds are required. To propagate sow seeds in October, March or April in pots of seed compost and put in greenhouse or cold frame. Transfer seedlings to 3" pots and grow on until they are ready for planting out in March or April, September or October, depending on the time of sowing. Damage may be caused to leaves and shoots by slugs and snails once outside.

C.burghaltii, height 18-24, planting distance 9-12" is a perennial border hybrid with ovate mid-green leaves formed in tufts. The bell-shaped, blue-grey flowers, 2-2.5" long and deep purple in bud, are drooping and borne on wiry stems in June. C.glomerata. Height 4-18" with a spread of 12-24" is a variable species with ovate toothed, mid-green leaves. Dense flower heads of erect purple bell-like flowers 1" long are borne on rigid leafy stems from May to October.
Ring Plant Supports for Bushy Plants and Shrubs


Clematis

Clematis Old man's beard
Evergreen or deciduous twining climbers and herbaceous perennials, cultivated for their mass of flowers often followed by decorative seed heads. Grown on trellis, walls, trees, shrubs and other host plants. Early flowering varieties are evergreen although some later flowering species are semi-evergreen. Plant during October or May, Clematis like alkaline soil, in an open position but the base of the main stem should be shaded from strong sun. Young growth will need tying, staking or plant supports. All herbaceous clematis will benefit from an annual mulch in spring of compost, peat or well-rotted manure.

C.montana is a popular vigorous climber suitable for growing over large buildings and trees, grows up to 40ft. It is one of the easiest flowering climbers to cultivate. It produces large white flowers 1 - 2in across in large clusters from the leaf axils in May. 'Elizabeth' soft pink; 'Rubens', bronze-green foliage and pale pink flowers. C.alpina grows up to 6ft, a deciduous species best grown in plant supports or on stakes against a wall, or over an old bush or tree stump. It has pendulous cup-shaped violet blue flowers, 1-1.5in. wide and with pale grey staminodes produced in April or May. 'Siberica'.Syn.'Alba' is a white flowered form.
Plant Supports for Climbers or Tomatoes


Crocosmia Montbretia

Crocosmia Montbretia
Crocosmia are a genus of corms grown for their brightly coloured flowers produced mainly in summer. They are frost hardy and like well-drained soil and an open sunny site. In very cold areas, plant in a sheltered position or lift to store for winter. Crocosmia form large dense clumps of sword-shaped erect dark green leaves. To propagate divide as growth starts in the spring. The stems grow up to 3ft and bear double ranks of tubular flowers in various shades of orange and red from midsummer onwards.

Numerous varieties are available and include 'Earlham Hybrids' which have large flowers in mixed orange or red shades. 'Emily McKensie' has orange flecked with brown and 'His Majesty' bright scarlet with orange centre. C.aurea is a tuft-forming, summer flowering corm. Height 20-30", it has long narrow sword-shaped leaves and a loosely branched spike of tubular orange or yellow flowers each 1-2" long with 6 spreading petals. All Crocosmia will need some staking or a plant support especially when in flower. They make a good sculptural dramatic edition to borders.
Plant Supports for Large Plants


Dahlia

Dahlia
Half-hardy tuberous perennials Dahlias have widely ranging forms and colours and make outstanding plants for garden decoration and as cut flowers. Dahlias are divided into two groups - bedding, grown as annuals from seeds and border Dahlias which are suitable for borders but should ideally be grown on their own. To cultivate border varieties plant the un-sprouted tubers in mid-April at least 4" deep.

Rooted cutting and sprouting tubers can be planted the third week in May unless the weather is cold and wet then wait until it gets warmer. Well drained soil enriched with compost, manure plus bone-meal (4oz. per sq.yd) raked in at planting time. Border Dahlias like an open sunny position and preferably a bed of their own. All border plants need plant supports or staking.

D. 'Abridge Taffy' a decorative flowered Dahlia, height 4ft. it produces white flowers 3-4" across from mid-summer to late autumn. It is suitable for exhibition. D. 'Bishop of Llandaff' height 3ft has bronze-green leaves and single open-centred dark re flowers 4-5" across. It is an excellent bedding plant.
Plant Supports for Large Plants


Delphiniums

Delphinium
Grown for their spikes of irregularly cup-shaped sometimes hooded, spurred flowers, delphiniums are tall (4-8ft) and planted at the back of herbaceous borders. Fully to half-hardy they need an open sunny position and fertile well-drained soil. Tall varieties need staking or plant supports, ample feeding and watering in spring and early summer.

To propagate divide and replant in March or April. Perennial species can be raised from seeds sown in the flowering site in April. D.elatum 'Betty Hay' a tall variety (4-6ft) with large flat florets, pale blue with a white eye, often semi-double or double. Smaller varieties include 'Blue Butterfly' (12in.) a hardy perennial with bright blue flowers.
Grow Through Plant Supports


Carnation

Dianthus Carnation, Pink
Mainly summer-flowering perennials, annuals and biennials, grown for their mass of scented flowers, excellent for cutting. Carnations and pinks are good for border decoration and pots. Border carnations are hardy perennial plants growing up to 2-3ft with a planting distance of 15-18". The flowering time is during July in the south and August in the north, the plants only flower once in a season. The plants are short lived and are best replaced after 2 years. Annual carnations (18" high planting distance 12") are half-hardy perennials, grown as annuals. They are not recommended for cold areas in the north.

They make excellent bedding plants flowering from July to the first frosts. To propagate both border and annual carnations sow seeds thinly in boxes of seed compost in a cold greenhouse or frame. When the first true leaves appear prick out the seedlings into suitable compost and grow on. Plant in the flowering site when the plants are well-developed. Dianthus are tolerant of alkaline soils and like the sun. Pinks are hardy perennials and suitable for planting in rock gardens or at the front of borders. They are small, clump forming low spreading with one flowering period in summer.

D.'Monica Wyatt' is a modern pink, very fragrant with double cyclamen -pink flowers each with a magenta eye. It is very free flowering and provides excellent cut flowers. The following carnations provide a good colour range - 'Fragrant Ann': white; ' Viking' or 'Canup's Pride' cerise or 'Brigadoon': yellow. Most carnations will need a plant support.
Plant Supports for Small to Medium Sized Garden Plants


Digitalis Foxglove

Digitalis Foxglove
Biennials and perennials. Some foxgloves are ever-green and grown for their flower spikes in summer. Fully frost hardy they grow in most conditions. They can be propagated by seed in autumn. The larger plants can be divided in spring. They look good at the back of a mixed border. They are also excellent for cutting.

D.purpurea is upright 3-5ft high, fairly compact. It a short lived perennial with rough green leaves and in summer has tall spikes of tubular flowers in shades of white, re, purple or white. D.purpurea 'Excelsior' grows to 5ft. the flowers surround the spike and are held horizontally which shows the markings in the tubular floret. The large spikes bear cream, white and purple flowers.
Plant Supports for medium to large plants


Euphorbia Milkweed

Euphorbia Milkweed, Spurge
Genus of shrubs, succulents and perennials, some of which are evergreen or semi-evergreen, and annuals. Flower heads consist of cup-shaped bracts, in various colours, and usually contain several flowers lacking typical sepals and petals. It is fully hardy to tender, to min 5-15C. Likes sun or partial shade in moist well-drained soil. Propagate by division in spring or early autumn, basal cuttings in spring or summer and seeds in autumn or spring. Euphoria has a milky sap which may irritate skin. Propagation of succulents - germinate freely from seeds provided they are fresh.

E.fulgens (Scarlet plume) is an evergreen shrub height 3-5ft. It has elliptic to lance-shaped green leaves 4" long, and bears leafy, wand -like sprays of small flowers, each cluster surrounded by 5 petal-like bright scarlet bracts in winter-spring. E.rigida is an evergreen frost hardy erect perennial (18" high). In early spring it produces terminal heads of yellow flowers with cup-shaped bracts above oblong to oval, pointed, grey-green leaves.
Large Bow Plant Supports


Geranium Cranesbill

Geranium Cranesbill
Hardy perennials not to be confused with the bedding or pot varieties - Pelargonium. The species varies in size and habit, some are suitable for ground cover and borders, others for rock gardens. Plant geraniums between September and March in any ordinary well-drained soil, in sun or partial shade. Cut back old flowering stems to encourage new growth. Geraniums will thrive in any but water-logged soil. They can be propagated by semi-ripe cuttings in summer or by seed or division in autumn or spring.

G. grandiflorum (12in.) is a bushy spreading variety with round, mid-green, long stalked leaves and blue-purple flowers that appear in June and July. G.ibericum (18-24 in.) another spreading variety, with glossy violet-blue flowers 1in across, very good ground cover clumps of colour. Both these varieties may need staking or plants supports.
Plant Supports for Border Edging


Heather Ericaeae

Heather Ericaeae
Heathers or Heaths are suitable for rock gardens making good ground-cover plants, several varieties are suitable for hedging and others are good as cut flowers, and those with double flowers may be dried for winter decoration. Tree heaths are evergreen and grow up to 20ft. They are frost hardy but liable to damage from frost and cold winds. They have needle-like, bright green leaves in whorls and scented bell-shaped, white flowers from late winter to late spring. 'Albert's Gold' (6ft) retains its golden foliage all year round.

Heathers and heaths prefer peaty, acid soils, although they may tolerate others, they like an open position in full sun; they should be kept free of fallen leaves. To propagate use cuttings taken from July to October. Use side shoots 1-2" long. Insert the shoots a third of their length in pots of a moist, well-drained compost such as 2 parts sand and 1 part acid peat.

Root the cuttings in a mist propagator. Transplant when the cuttings are 3" high. Large plants can layered in March by bending the healthy stems down to soil level and burying under the soil with the tips showing. Keep in position with peg - after a year the layers should have rooted. They can be cut and set out in their permanent positions. Cut back winter and spring flowering heaths after flowering. Bushy varieties need appropriate plant supports as do tree ericas. The showiest winter-flowering ericas, such as E.carnea, E.mediterranea and x darleyensis grow well in chalky soil as do tall plants.
Large Bow Plant Supports


Helenium Sneezeweed

Helenium Sneezeweed
Late summer and autumn flowering perennials and annuals grown for their sprays of daisy-like flower heads, each with a prominent, central disc. They require full sun and any well-drained soil. They are fully hardy. Helenium can be propagated by division and replanting between October and April. In exposed positions support the plants with canes or plant supports. Some early flowering varieties produce a second crop of flower heads if the first flush has been cut back when finished. Cut down dead stems in November. Dividing and replanting every three years improves flowering.

H. 'Bressingham Gold' is an erect bushy perennial with thick stems. It has lance-shaped, mid-green leaves and sprays of bright yellow flower heads in late summer and autumn. It grows to 3ft and has a spread of 2ft. H.'Riverton Gem' (4ft) has sprays of red and gold flower heads in late summer and autumn, thick stems with lance-shaped leaves
Large Bow Plant Supports


Lily

Lily
Grown for their fragrant brightly coloured flowers lilies are mainly summer flowering bulbs. Each bulb produces an un-branched leafy stem, sometimes with annual roots in the lower plant. There are several flowers per stem, mainly trumpet to bowl- shaped. Each plant has a spread of up to 12". Frost handy, lilies need sun and well-drained soil. Propagate by seed in autumn or spring, or plant bulb scales in summer. Lilies are easy to grow, there are 80 species to choose from. They are suitable for cutting for large flower arrangements. All lilies need a plant support.

There are many varieties of lily - A.auratum (Golden-rayed lily) is a particularly dramatic specimen. It reached 5-6ft and has a planting distance of 12". Planting depth for bulbs 6-11". Suitable for border, pot or tub it has fragrant bowl-shaped flowers up to 12". The flowers are brilliant white with golden-yellow rays or bands and raised deep purple wine-colour spots on the inner surface of each flowers. L.'Enchantment' has vibrant orange flowers, L.'Green Emerald' has huge white trumpets with bright yellow stamens.
Ring Plant Supports for Bushy Plants and Shrubs


Lupin

Lupinus Lupin
Genus of annuals, perennials and semi- evergreen shrubs, grown for their large racemes of pea-like flowers. They are excellent for planting in beds or borders. The flowers of the perennial species may be used for cutting. Grow Lupins in sun or partial shade in neutral or acid soil. The plants last longer in light soil. Plant from October to March and remove the flowering part of faded flower stems to prevent self-seeding and to encourage a second flowering later in the year. Flowering Lupins need plant supports.

L 'Flaming June' is a clump forming perennial growing to 4ft, 1-2ft spread. It is fully hardy. In early summer spikes of orange-red flowers arise from the palmate, deeply divided, mid-green leaves.
Plant Supports for medium to large plants


Peony

Paeony or Peony
Hardy herbaceous and shrubby perennial they are grown for their beautiful flowers and attractive foliage. Paeonies like moist but well-drained garden soil, in sun or half-shade; make sure the site is shaded from the early morning sun especially after frost. Plant between September and March, incorporate well decayed manure or compost when digging and preparing the ground.

Paeonys are fully hardy. The tall and exceptionally large flowered cultivars such as P.'Argosy' (tree paeony) grows up to 5ft and needs a stake or plant support. Smaller clump-3ft forming varieties such as P. Baroness Schroeder' which has large double pale pink flowers growing to about 3ft. need staking or a plant support because the plant becomes heavy with its foliage and flowers.
Plant Supports for Peonies


Penstemons

Penstemon
Penstemons are a genus of annuals, perennials and sub-shrubs and shrubs which have become increasingly popular over recent years. Most of them are ever-green or semi ever-green, fully to half hardy. Penstemons do get a bit leggy and woody and need pruning annually after the winter is over (early April to early May) the timing is important as the old stems shelter the new shoots from late frosts. Penstemons are fairly short-lived, dislike wet conditions and need stakes or plant supports when flowering. All species do well in any ordinary well-drained soil and in full sun. No winter protection is necessary for these hardy plants.

P. 'King George' is a semi-evergreen variety, it is upright, grows to 30" and is frost hardy. It has trumpet snap-dragon-white throated bright crimson flowers from mid-summer until the first frosts. P.hirsutus is a short-lived, evergreen open shrub. It grows to about 3ft, spreads 1-2 ft. It produces hairy, tubular, lipped purple or blue-flushed white flowers. Oval dark green leaves. Both these varieties might need staking or plant supports.
Plant Supports for Small to Medium Sized Garden Plants


Phlox

Phlox
Hardy herbaceous perennial and annuals grown for their profusion of brightly coloured flowers. Used for mixed borders and cutting it flowers late spring into summer. Phlox needs planting in a sunny or partially shaded spot in October or February to March Mulch well rotted manure or compost very year in April to preserve moisture around the roots.

Plants will flower poorly unless they are watered regularly on light soil during dry spells. Staking or plant supports will be needed for older plants that produce a lot of shoots - the weaker shoots should be thinned out in the spring. Cut dead flower stems down in October to just above ground level. P.maculata (3ft) is a fully hardy erect perennial, which in summer produces cylindrical panicles of tubular 5-lobed, mauve-pink flowers from oval, mid-green leaves. 'Alpha' has rose-pink flowers.
Plant Supports for medium to large plants


Poppy

Papaver Poppy
Annuals, biennials and perennials, some are semi-evergreen. Papaver are fully hardy, they need sun and prefer moist but well-drained soil. Most are suitable for mixed and herbaceous borders and rock gardens. The plants need staking or plant supports as they grow. Dead-head after flowering.

To propagate the perennial species, divide and replant the roots in March or April. Root cuttings of P.orientale can be taken and planted in a cold frame in winter. To propagate annual seeds of annual poppies sow in the flowering site in March or April or September just covering them with soil. Most poppies will also self-seed.

P.orientale (oriental poppy) grows to 2-3ft, planting distance 24". Hardy spreading border plant, it has scarlet flowers 3-4" or more across, usually with a black blotch at the base of the petals. Flowers are produced from May to early June. Other popular varieties include 'Mrs Perry' soft salmon-pink flowers, 'Storm Torch' fiery red flowers.
Spiral Ring Plant Supports


Rudbeckia Coneflower

Rudbeckia Coneflower
A genus of annuals, biennials and perennials with flower heads that are excellent for cutting. They are fully hardy, thrive in the sun or shade and like well-drained moist soil All the perennial species and varieties, together with the taller of the annual species require staking or plant supports in exposed positions. Plant perennials in October, March or April. On dry soils mulch with decayed manure early in spring, unless height restriction of the tall species is wanted. Dead head regularly as the flowers fade and cut the stems down in November. Rudbeckia looks good in large beds or borders.

R.laciniata 'Golden Glow' is an erect perennial (6-7ft. spread 2-3ft. It bears daisy-like, double golden-yellow flower heads with green centres in late summer or early autumn. R.hirta is moderately fast-growing upright short-lived perennial, grown as an annual. Height is 1-3ft. with 1-2ft spread. It has lance-shaped mid-green leaves and large daisy-like deep yellow flower heads with conical (hence 'coneflower'), purple centres. Appears in summer and autumn. Prefers sun and well-drained soil.
Large Bow Plant Supports


Sedums

Sedum Stone-crop
Sedums are succulents, (they store water in their leaves) annual, evergreen biennial deciduous and evergreen shrubs and sub-shrubs suitable for borders or rock gardens and dry stone walls. Sedums are fully hardy to frost, need sun and grow well in any soil although does better in fertile well-drained soil. All perennial species are easily divided and replanted from October to March, even small pieces without roots will usually grow.

A tall variety of Sedum A.aizoon 'Aurantiacum' (18in) is fully hardy has fleshy mid-green leaves and in summer bears flat heads of star-shaped yellow flowers. Other well known European Sedums are mat forming evergreen alpine varieties such as S.acre 'Aureum' (1-2in high spread 12in) In spring and early summer has spreading shoots, yellow-tipped and tiny fleshy yellow leaves. It produces flat heads of tiny, bright yellow flowers. S.'Atropurpureum' (18in) planting distance 15in. is an excellent border plant, it has purple leaves, pink flower heads (2 -6in across) which appear during September and October. Taller varieties will need supporting during the flowering season.

Plant Supports for medium to large plants


Sunflower

Sunflower Helianthus
Summer and autumn flowering annuals and perennials, grown for their large, daisy -like flower heads. Sunflowers are fully hardy, can be invasive, prefer hot sun and well-drained soil. All sunflowers need staking or plant supports. Remove dead flowers to prevent self-seeding. Plant perennials in October, November or April. Divide double varieties every third year, or they may revert to single forms. Sow seeds of annuals and perennials during March or April in a sunny position - at the back a large border. Seeds of annuals may be sown under glass in February or March, grow seedlings to 3" in pots; harden off in a cold frame and then plant out in May. Divide perennials between October and April and replant in permanent position.

H.ammiis (sunflower) grows to between 3-10ft. with a planting distance of 12-18". It is an annual with mid-green heart-shaped leaves that are coarsely toothed. The flowers have large brown or purple discs enclosed by bright yellow petals and are borne singly. 'Monarch' 4-6ft. bears semi-double golden flowers up to 6" across, in September. 'Italian White' grows to 4ft and has a black-centred, creamy-white flower.

Cane Support Rings for Tall Plants


Thalictrum Meadow-rue

Thalictrum, Meadow-rue
Hardy herbaceous perennial plants of which a few species are of garden value. They are suitable for rock gardens and herbaceous borders it also does well at edges of woodland gardens. Thalictrum are grown for their divided foliage and fluffy flower heads. The flowers lack petals, but each has a prominent tufts of stamens and 4-5 sepals, which rapidly fall. It is fully hardy, needs sun or light shade and grows well in well-drained soil although some species prefer cool, moist conditions. Divide and replant the roots in March or April, divided plants take a while to establish, Thalictrum is better propagate from seeds. Plant in March or April in sun or light shade, staking or plant supports should be done before the plants become too tall.

T.chelidonii is a clump forming perennial (3-5ft. spread 2ft) it has finely divided, mid green leaves and in summer produces panicles of fluffy mauve flowers. It prefers cool soil that does not dry out. T.adiantifolium grows to 3ft with a planting distance of 18". It is grown for its grey-green foliage composed of numerous small leaflets like those of maidenhair fern. The insignificant purple-green flowers appear in loose terminal panicles 4-6" in July.
Plant Supports for medium to large plants


Verbascum

Verbascum Mullein
Hardy perennial and biennial herbaceous plants and sub-shrubs that can evergreen or semi-evergreen. Verbascum are mainly tall stately plants, excellent for growing at the back of borders, in groups or island beds, also for wild garden planting. Some varieties are suitable for rock gardens. The flowers of Verbascum are saucer-shaped, 1-1.5" across, with a central boss of fluffy stamens, the large leaves are often thickly felted with white hairs.

To cultivate grow in ordinary well-drained soil in full sun. Plant in October or March. Tall plants will need staking or plant supports. Remove faded flower spikes and cut the plants down to ground level in November. To propagate sow seeds in April in a cold frame. Prick out seedlings when 6" high and grow them on, finally moving the plants to the flowering site in September.

V. longifolium grows to between 3-4ft. and has a planting distance of 24". It has basal oblong-lance shaped leaves up to 24" long and covered with white or yellow hairs. Golden yellow flowers in dense spikes 18-24" long, in June to August. V.thapsus.height 3ft. planting distance 12" is a native biennial with clusters of oblong marginally toothed leaves covered with woolly hairs. Yellow flowers are borne in 12-18" long spikes from June to August.
Plant Supports for Peonies


Veronica

Veronica
Genus of perennials and sub-shrubs, some evergreen others semi-evergreen, grown for their usually blue flowers. The small-growing perennials are suitable for rock gardens and dry walls. Taller varieties are better grown in herbaceous and mixed borders. The saucer-shaped flowers, composed of a short tube and four irregularly sized petals, sometimes with darker veins are borne on their own or in terminal or lateral racemes. The shrubby species are now classified as Hebe. Grow Veronica in ordinary garden soil, enriched with well-rotted manure, the soil needs to well-drained but moisture retentive, in a sunny site or partial shade from September to March. Remove the spikes from tall erect plants after flowering. To propagate divide herbaceous perennial species every third year, for the alphine species divide and replant all species (except the invasive V.cinerea and V. pectinata) every year in March or April.

V.exaltata. Erect elegant perennial. Height 4ft. planting space 1ft.. It is fully hardy, it has tall racemes of star-shaped light blue flowers from mid-to late summer on stems clothed in narrowly oval, toothed, mid-green leaves. V.virginica. is an upright perennial growing to 4ft. spread 1.5ft. it is fully hardy. In late summer, racemes of small stat-shaped, purple-blue or pink flowers crown stems with whorls of narrowly lance-shaped, dark green leaves.
Plant Supports for medium to large plants

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